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ROMAN MAXIMIAN AR ARGENTEUS 286-310 AD CH AU 4-4 NGC

[ROMAN MAXIMIAN AR ARGENTEUS 286-310 AD CH AU 4-4 NGC: Front Picture]
[ROMAN MAXIMIAN AR ARGENTEUS 286-310 AD CH AU 4-4 NGC: Back Picture]
Maximian
Coin Denom:AR Argenteus
Coin Country:Roman Empire
Coin Composition:Silver
Coin Grade:CH AU
Coin Graded By:NGC
Coin Strike:4
Coin Surface:4
Coin Date: 286-310
Coin ID15539
Price: $1150.00
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Maximian

Roman Empire, Maximianus Herculius 286-310. AR Silver Argenteus (3.21gm). Struck Siscia mint. Obverse: MAXIMIA - NVS AVG, Laureate head right. Reverse: VIRTVS MILITVM Six-turreted camp gate with the four tetrarchs swearing over tripod; in exergue, SIS.

When Diocletian was proclaimed emperor in A.D. 284, he put Maximian in charge of the West and quickly elevated him first to the rank of Caesar and then to Augustus. Maximian dealt with German invasions and rebellion in Gaul while Diocletian remained in the East to fight the Persians. In A.D. 293 Diocletian put into effect his plan to reorganize and stabilize the administration of the empire and to strengthen its frontiers by establishing the tetrarchy or rule of four, in which there were to be two senior emperors, the Augusti, and two junior colleagues, the Caesares, each of whom was assigned responsibilty for one area of the empire. Diocletian and Maximian remained the Augusti, and Diocletian appointed Constantius and Galerius Caesares. The next year he introduced major financial reforms, including important changes in the coinage, one of which was the introduction of a fine silver coin called the argenteus. This coin is a typical example of the new denomination.

HISTORY:

as Caesar under Diocletian AD 285-286
as Augustus AD 286 - 305; AD 307-308; AD 310

Dynasty - Historical Period: In 285 the Roman Empire was split in half by Diocletian - The Western Roman Empire and the other half became known as the Eastern Roman Empire or the Byzantine Empire.

Two Caesars were appointed to assist in the control of the Empire: Galerius, reporting to Diocletian, who controlled the legions of the Danube and Constantius reporting to Maximianus who controlled Britain, Spain and Gaul

Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus (ca. AD 250-ca. 310)Name commonly known as: Maximianus (aka Herculius and also Maximian)
Married: Eutropia
Children: Theodora, Maxentius and Fausta
Son-in-law of Diocletian;
Father of Maxentius and Fausta;
Step-father of Theodora;
Grandfather of Romulus.

AD 285-286 - Caesar under Diocletian
AD 286-305 - First reign with Diocletian
AD 307-308 - Second reign with Maxentius and Constantine I
AD 310- Third reign as a usurper in Massilia

Maximian rose in the army, on the basis of his military skill, to become a trusted officer and friend of the emperor Diocletian, who made him caesar July 21, 285, and augustus April 1, 286. Maximian thus became in theory the colleague of Diocletian, but his role was always subordinate. Assigned the government of the West, Maximian defeated native revolts and a German invasion in Gaul, but he failed to suppress the revolt of Carausius in Gaul and Britain; after the institution of the tetrarch system (i.e., two augusti, each with one caesar under him), Constantius Chlorus, appointed caesar under Maximian in 293, took charge of these areas while Maximian continued to govern Italy, Spain, and Africa. Although long viewed by Christians as a persecutor of their religion, Maximian seems to have done no more than obediently execute in his part of the empire the first edict of Diocletian, which ordered the burning of the Scriptures and the closing of the churches. On May 1, 305, the same day that Diocletian abdicated at Nicomedia, Maximian abdicated, evidently reluctantly, at Mediolanum (modern Milan). As the new tetrarchy that succeeded them began to break down, Maximian reclaimed the throne to support his son Maxentius (307). Persuaded to abdicate once more by Diocletian in 308, he lived at the court of Constantine, who had recently married his daughter Fausta. Maximian committed suicide shortly after the suppression of a revolt raised by him against Constantine.

Item ID: 2562
Unit ID: 15539

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